Looking to the future

So, it’s been ten days since the election, and now that the dust has settled, many of you have asked what’s next. I think it’s clear to everyone on all sides of the fence that 26 was not the end of personhood, nationally or even here in Mississippi.

Post-election comments from Personhood USA make it clear that they’re gearing up for other fights. (Also of note in that article: admissions by Dr. Eric Webb of Yes On 26 that IVF doctors would be criminally liable for lab accidents, and by Jennifer Mason of Personhood USA that lifesaving terminations would not be allowed for cancer patients.)

Locally, Personhood Mississippi is already discussing legislative approaches to pass personhood. They’re reworking their PAC structure, and they’ve even specifically mentioned Georgia’s 2009 SB 169 as model legislation. (See Renee Whitley’s guest post on Voices of the Stroller Brigade for more on the SB 169 fight.)

The defeat of 26 was a major victory, but it’s clear that there is more work to do, and Parents Against MS 26 is committed to continuing the fight. We have the PAC infrastructure in place, and we are already beginning to explore the transition to legislative work.

Going forward, we will be re-branding our site as Parents Against Personhood, and reorganizing our existing content into a more comprehensive resource for personhood issues across states. We look forward to expanding it as well, with more in-depth articles on various aspects of the complex medico-legal issues generated by personhood. In the meantime, the Parents Against MS 26 site will remain available for archival purposes; Yes On 26 may have removed their entire Internet presence within three hours of the election results, but we stand behind every word we’ve written. We’re very excited to be able to share our new site with you in just a few short weeks!

We want to give you all our most sincere thanks for everything you did to help defeat Initiative 26. We hope you’ll continue to stand by us in the upcoming election cycle.

About Atlee Breland

I'm a Mississippian, a Christian, a computer programmer, a wife, and -- thanks to infertility treatment -- a mother of three wonderful children.
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3 Responses to Looking to the future

  1. Margaret says:

    Y’all are inspirational. I am so impressed with everything you know and I’m very proud to know you. Thank you for fighting so hard for all of us.

    • Margaret says:

      I meant everything you’ve done, now what you know! That’s what I get for posting right after waking up.

  2. Ron Runnels says:

    Hi, the thread below would not let me post another reply, so I copied and pasted it here at the bottom of this comment box to ask for clarification. I am not arguing here that 26 should have passed. I am genuinely interested in understanding your thought process in the comments below regarding rape cases.

    “When you get pregnant, there is a 1 in 17,000 chance you will die as a direct result of it, and a much greater chance that you will suffer a major complication such as hemorrhage or infection.”
    When you abort a pregnancy, there is a 1 in 1 chance the baby will die.
    “When you didn’t voluntarily create the pregnancy, you’re saying that rape victims should be forced to take those risks, because of something which they couldn’t prevent or control.
    But the baby is innocent and helpless.
    “What if the depression and the trauma of the raped woman are so great she considers–or commits–suicide?”
    Does dispoing of the baby relieve the depression and trauma?
    “Also, almost all drugs used in the treatment of depression, trauma, and PTSD are not approved for use in pregnant women.”
    Raises an interesting question–why are pregnant women not allowed to use these drugs?

    The question is: Do you believe the fetus is a person or not?
    If not, then I can easily understand your positions.
    But if you believe it is a person, then as difficult and unfair as those situations are for the mother, I do not see how you justify killing the baby. Please help me understand.
    Thanks,
    Ron

    Responses to Personal Stories: Jamie
    Ron Runnels says:
    November 2, 2011 at 4:29 pm
    I have no problem with IVF, and I would likely support sacrificing the baby fetus’ life to save the mother in the case of ectopic pregnancy. However, I do not understand the rape argument.

    My heart breaks for a rape victim, and I realize I cannot even begin to imagine the horror and trauma they live with, but i still find it disturbingly shocking to hear a woman say in effect, “I would have to kill that baby because its father is evil,” and/or, “It would be indescribably inconvenient for me to allow this baby to live.”

    Atlee Breland says:
    November 4, 2011 at 2:30 am
    Pregnancy and childbirth still pose serious risks to the physical health and life of mother, even with modern medicine. When you get pregnant, there is a 1 in 17,000 chance you will die as a direct result of it, and a much greater chance that you will suffer a major complication such as hemorrhage or infection.

    When you didn’t voluntarily create the pregnancy, you’re saying that rape victims should be forced to take those risks, because of something which they couldn’t prevent or control.

    Your Neighbor in Louisiana says:
    November 8, 2011 at 6:38 pm
    What if the depression and the trauma of the raped woman are so great she considers–or commits–suicide? Mental health is no less important, just because you cannot see the scars. Also, almost all drugs used in the treatment of depression, trauma, and PTSD are not approved for use in pregnant women.